How can early identification of AKI affect patient outcomes?

Dr. Jeffery Vender examines how new biomarkers could benefit patients by identifying their risk for acute kidney injury earlier. AKI is often recognized late and can result in morbidity, mortality and increased cost of care.

A Familiar Danger

Acute kidney injury is an all too common complication, afflicting between 7 percent and 18 percent of all hospitalized patients4 and up to 50 % of critically ill patients.5 The condition is associated with a 10-fold increase in hospital mortality rates and a higher rate of chronic kidney disease among post-op patients.3

The Challenges of Timely Identification

While a number of acute and patient risk factors have been identified for AKI, there is no reliable way for a clinician to establish a clear risk profile.2

Delays in recognizing acute kidney injury can potentially lead to irreversible consequences,4 but the good news is that in many cases, adverse patient outcomes are avoidable if the condition is recognized and managed in a timely fashion.6

Asymptomatic
Symptomatic
PATIENT RISK FACTORS7
ADVANCED AGE
FEMALE
BLACK RACE
CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE
CHRONIC DISEASE (HEART, LUNG, LIVER)
DIABETES MELLITUS
CANCER
ANEMIA
DEHYDRATION
ACUTE RISK FACTORS8-11
SEPSIS
PNEUMONIA
CARDIOGENIC SHOCK
MAJOR SURGERY
CARDIAC SURGERY
NEPHROTOXIC DRUGS
RADIOCONTRAST AGENTS
HYPOVOLEMIA
Unfortunately, traditional methods have proven to be insufficient for timely diagnosis,12 spurring a growing consensus that better diagnostic and predictive tools are needed to reduce the burden of AKI.4 Acute kidney injury claims about 2 million lives a year,13 but among admitted patients diagnosed via traditional methods who died from hospital-acquired acute kidney injury10:

31%

OF CASES WERE AVOIDABLE

43%

EXPERIENCED UNACCEPTABLE DELAYED DIAGNOSES

54%

HAD INADEQUATE RISK ASSESSMENT